Breast Cancer Awareness Month and International Day of Radiology Raise Awareness, but Our Focus on Breast Cancer Lasts All Year Long

Breast Cancer Awareness Month and International Day of Radiology Raise Awareness, but Our Focus on Breast Cancer Lasts All Year Long

International Day of Radiology, November 8, Follows Breast Cancer Awareness Month in Spotlighting Advances in Breast Cancer Screening, Treatment

International day of Radiology LogoThe fifth annual International Day of Radiology (IDoR) is focusing on breast imaging, and celebrates the tens of thousands of lives saved by the many contributions of Radiologists and breast imagers. Lake Medical Imaging is proud to be one of more than 100 medical facilities around the globe taking part in IDoR. This year’s International Day of Radiology commemorates the 121st anniversary of the discovery of the X-ray and occurs during a celebration of National Radiologic Technology Week (Nov. 6–12).

We’re following up on our many breast cancer awareness month activities by joining with the American College of Radiology, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) and accrediting organizations around the world – all of who have expertise in breast cancer care — to reinforce the fact that women 40 and older should get annual mammograms.

Mammograms Save Lives. Period. End of Story.

At Lake Medical Imaging, every day, every week, and every month is dedicated to breast cancer awareness.

While it’s taken decades to appreciate just how many women are saved because of mammograms, the data is clear. Breast cancer deaths have fallen 34 percent in the past 20 years – from 33 to 22 per 100,000 women between 1990 and 2011. And that represents 200,000 lives saved.

We know that annual screening mammography starting at age 40 results in the greatest mortality reduction, the most lives saved and the most life years gained.

Mammograms can also prevent the need for extensive treatment for advanced cancers and improve chances of breast conservation.

At present, there are no tests to replace mammograms. They can actually show changes in the breast up to two years before a patient or physician can feel them, and are a crucial and life-saving tool in the fight against breast cancer.

If you haven’t scheduled your mammogram this year, take time to do it now.

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